How does sleep affect the brain?

Sleep is important for several brain functions, including how nerve cells (neurons) communicate with each other. In fact, the brain and body stay very active while you sleep.

How does sleep affect the brain?

Sleep is important for several brain functions, including how nerve cells (neurons) communicate with each other. In fact, the brain and body stay very active while you sleep. Recent findings suggest that SLEEP plays a cleansing function that removes toxins in the brain that build up while you are awake. It occurs when the airways become blocked, resulting in lapses in breathing during sleep and a reduction in oxygen in the blood.

Studies have found that some people may be more inclined to have cognitive impairment due to lack of sleep, and even this may have a genetic component. Since sleep is so crucial to the formation and consolidation of memories, some sleep disorders are associated with memory problems. Siebern, PhD, member of the Insomnia and Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program at Stanford University's Center for Sleep Medicine. Every person should strive to achieve the optimal amount of night sleep, as too little or too much can have negative repercussions.

Most people are familiar with the daytime effects that result from a poor night's sleep, such as drowsiness and fatigue. The researchers estimated that people who sleep underneath and those who sleep excessively were mentally two years older than women who closed their eyes seven to eight hours a night. The average person spends 25 years, or one-third of their life expectancy, in this unconscious and highly vulnerable state; and yet the precise function of sleep escapes us. In an article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, they reported that total levels of beta amyloid increased by about 5 percent after a night of sleep deprivation, in the right hippocampus and thalamus, which are affected early in Alzheimer's.

can interfere with the process of consolidation of memory, which causes people to have difficulty remembering certain memories of their own life. Some studies have found that lack of sleep hinders cognitive flexibility, which reduces the ability to adapt and thrive in uncertain or changing circumstances. The space between brain cells expands significantly during sleep, which facilitates the cleaning of dirt through the cerebrospinal fluid. Drowsiness causes slower reaction time, a special problem when driving, working, or other tasks that require a quick response.

I have never known about these kinds of serious negative effects of sleeping less and sleeping too much, I mean what you have described and explained above, such as heart disease, stroke, type II diabetes, depression, etc. hormones, mentioned above, which can increase the risk of heart and diabetes, as well as inflammation, which in turn can increase the risk of cancer.

Lena Dubler
Lena Dubler

Amateur analyst. Typical travel geek. Proud social media expert. Hipster-friendly travel buff. Avid coffee evangelist.

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