Can sleep apnea go away by itself?

In general, obstructive SLEEP apnea is a chronic condition that does not go away on its own. For the most part, sleep apnea is a chronic condition that doesn't go away.

Can sleep apnea go away by itself?

In general, obstructive SLEEP apnea is a chronic condition that does not go away on its own. For the most part, sleep apnea is a chronic condition that doesn't go away. Anatomy tends to remain fixed, especially after adolescence is over. Therefore, children with sleep apnea can maintain hope that the condition will be treated successfully and definitively.

Removal of tonsils and adenoids with tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy can be very beneficial for children with sleep apnea. Treating allergies and hard palate expansion with orthodontic therapy called rapid maxillary expansion may be helpful. Sleep apnea is a serious condition in which the patient repeatedly stops breathing while sleeping due to obstruction of the airway opening. This condition rarely resolves on its own, and most patients will need some intervention to control their symptoms and protect their health.

That said, snoring in itself, although annoying, is not the same as sleep apnea. Snoring is just the vibration sound created by airway resistance. You can snore loudly and not have sleep apnea, and you may even have sleep apnea without snoring too much. In many cases, people don't know that they have stopped breathing and believe that their sleep cycle is normal.

Sleep apnea may sound like snoring. If you have been suffering from any symptoms of sleep apnea, such as loud and excessive snoring, daytime sleepiness or frequent headaches or sore throat when you wake up, don't ignore them. Obstructive sleep apnea occurs when any part of the airways, from the tip of the nose to the lungs, collapses during sleep and stops breathing. It's time to pay attention to the risks of sleep apnea because women begin to catch up with men in apnea rates after menopause, says Jun.

People who are overweight are more likely to have extra tissue in the back of the throat, which can fall through the airways and block airflow to the lungs while they sleep. This condition is different from obstructive sleep apnea, in which you can't breathe normally due to obstruction of your upper airways. Although there are different types of sleep apnea, obstructive sleep apnea is the type of obstructive sleep apnea that people suffer most often. A recent Johns Hopkins study looked at what happens to metabolism at night when patients with sleep apnea don't use their CPAP.

A sleep specialist may order a sleep apnea test, which uses equipment to monitor breathing and oxygen levels while you sleep. If you're looking for options outside the sleep lab and in-network, here are four CPAP machines you should consider from top brands. Oral appliances can help with sleep apnea by repositioning your jaw or tongue to keep your airways open while you sleep. Sleep apnea occurs in about 3 percent of people with normal weight, but affects more than 20 percent of obese people, says Jun.

The good news is that, for most people, sleep apnea can go away if they partner with a sleep doctor to diagnose the specific cause of apnea and follow the treatment prescribed by the doctor. Having obstructive sleep apnea puts you at risk for other conditions, such as high blood pressure and stroke. There are many studies that show that losing weight can completely cure sleep apnea or at least make it less severe, says Jun. However, before continuing treatment, patients must complete a sleep study to obtain a definitive diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea.

.

Lena Dubler
Lena Dubler

Amateur analyst. Typical travel geek. Proud social media expert. Hipster-friendly travel buff. Avid coffee evangelist.

Leave a Comment

All fileds with * are required