Why does sleep paralysis occur?

Causes of sleep paralysis Researchers believe that SLEEP paralysis is caused by an altered rapid eye movement cycle because it mainly occurs when people fall into or out of REM sleep. During that stage, their brains normally paralyze their muscles anyway, so they don't make their dreams come true.

Why does sleep paralysis occur?

Causes of sleep paralysis Researchers believe that SLEEP paralysis is caused by an altered rapid eye movement cycle because it mainly occurs when people fall into or out of REM sleep. During that stage, their brains normally paralyze their muscles anyway, so they don't make their dreams come true. With all these correlations, it is unknown whether there is any causation and, if so, whether sleep paralysis is the cause, the effect or whether the relationship is bidirectional. However, it is estimated that 10% of people have more recurrent or bothersome episodes that make sleep paralysis especially distressing.

CBT has an established history of treating mental health conditions such as anxiety and PTSD, which can be factors that influence the risk of sleep paralysis. Sleep deprivation can lead to excessive drowsiness and many other consequences for a person's overall health. However, these medicines can have side effects and can cause a rebound in REM sleep when someone stops taking them. Indeed, the atony and mental images of REM sleep seem to persist even in a state of alert and awake.

The less anxiety you have, the better your chances of spending the night without interruptions in sleep. During both times, the eyes move quickly and dreams occur as part of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but the muscles are very relaxed. While it may seem that nothing is wrong in the moment, she says, what you prepare your brain before you fall asleep can have a dramatic impact on how you actually sleep and whether there is any disruption. Estimates vary, but researchers believe that about 8% of people experience sleep paralysis at some point in their lives.

Narcolepsy is an overwhelming need for sleep caused by a problem with the brain's ability to regulate sleep. Making sure you get enough sleep, make sure you get enough rest, and have healthy sleep habits are other things to consider. Studies have examined the data to see what is associated with an increased risk of sleep paralysis and found conflicting results. If you're concerned about frequent episodes of sleep paralysis, your doctor may recommend that you see a sleep specialist for further evaluation.

While harmless, this problem can be very frightening and the fear of having an episode can interfere with a good night's sleep.

Lena Dubler
Lena Dubler

Amateur analyst. Typical travel geek. Proud social media expert. Hipster-friendly travel buff. Avid coffee evangelist.

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