How long can a person live with untreated sleep apnea?

If left untreated, obstructive SLEEP apnea can shorten your life by 12 to 15 years. While there is no permanent cure for obstructive sleep apnea, proper diagnosis and treatment is necessary to alleviate its effects and ensure that your OSA will not shorten your life.

How long can a person live with untreated sleep apnea?

If left untreated, obstructive SLEEP apnea can shorten your life by 12 to 15 years. While there is no permanent cure for obstructive sleep apnea, proper diagnosis and treatment is necessary to alleviate its effects and ensure that your OSA will not shorten your life. Sleep apnea is dangerous because, if left untreated, it causes high blood pressure and is associated with an increased likelihood of heart attack, abnormal heart rhythms, and heart failure. Studies have shown that sleep apnea can decrease life expectancy by several years.

In addition, people with untreated sleep apnea find that their concentration, concentration and organizational capacity are reduced. In addition, sleep apnea is linked to a higher incidence of car accidents due to decreased attention. Sleep apnea occurs in about 3 percent of people with normal weight, but affects more than 20 percent of obese people, says Jun. In general, sleep apnea affects men more than women.

However, sleep apnea rates increase markedly in women after Sleep apnea is often linked to heart disease and metabolic problems, such as diabetes. Sleep apnea causes hypoxia (a low level of oxygen in the body). When this happens, the body becomes stressed and reacts with a fight or flight response, causing the heart to beat faster and the arteries to narrow. You can snore loudly and not have sleep apnea, and you may even have sleep apnea without snoring too much.

It is also important to note that sleep apnea, due to its impact on the neurochemical function of the brain, can lead to mood disorders and depression. Sleep apnea alters circadian rhythms, imbalances body and brain chemistry, disrupts heart and respiratory function, raises blood pressure, and speeds up heart rate. According to Young, most previous studies on sleep apnea and mortality have involved patients referred for clinical diagnostic evaluation of sleep; the risk of mortality from sleep apnea has not been previously reported in the general population. If sleep apnea is left untreated, the chance of needing further treatment for atrial fibrillation increases by up to 80 percent.

Therefore, consider the lack of sleep in the partner as a possible complication of sleep apnea, which can also affect the health of your partner and your relationship. ASAA Thanks Los Angeles County Coroner's Office for Declaring Leading Cause of Death is Sleep Apnea. Moderate sleep apnea increases risk of death by 17%, says American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Sleep is the official journal of Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC, a joint venture of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society.

Some possible reasons include the fact that these drivers tend to be middle-aged men, are sedentary, eat out (usually unhealthy fast food), and tend to have poor sleep habits due to their work schedules (which can contribute to weight gain), says Chervin. We imagine a world in which most people suffering from sleep apnea are diagnosed, aware, educated and treated. The effects of sleep apnea are best explained by looking at what happens to the body when the condition is present. Although participants with mild sleep apnea (AHI) of five to 1 or moderate sleep apnea (AHI) of 15 to 2 had a mortality risk that was 50 percent higher than those without sleep apnea, the results did not reach statistical significance.

Your partner or other family member may notice that you snore, breathe in, or stop breathing during sleep or that you wake up suddenly. Unfortunately, substance use and abuse can also cause sleep disturbances, which only thwarts the matter. .

Lena Dubler
Lena Dubler

Amateur analyst. Typical travel geek. Proud social media expert. Hipster-friendly travel buff. Avid coffee evangelist.

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