Which sleeping position is the best?

Breathing movements of the rib cage require more energy due to the need to raise the body against gravity in the frontal position, which may explain why many people avoid sleeping on their stomach. Sleeping on your side with one arm above your head is the most common position for SLEEPING, accounting for 55 percent of the time you sleep in bed.

Which sleeping position is the best?

Breathing movements of the rib cage require more energy due to the need to raise the body against gravity in the frontal position, which may explain why many people avoid sleeping on their stomach. Sleeping on your side with one arm above your head is the most common position for SLEEPING, accounting for 55 percent of the time you sleep in bed. As for the disadvantages, couples may wake up more often by sleeping this way, as their partner is more likely to drive them. Because you press the face in a lateral position, this pose can cause facial wrinkles and cause the skin of the face to expand over time.

Sleeping on your back is the worst sleeping position for people with snoring and sleep apnea because it makes you susceptible to airway collapse. If you find it hard to kick the habit of sleeping on your stomach, try sleeping on your side with a body or side pillow. Even if your bedtime changes every night or you wake up at very different times each morning, there is probably a position that is your favorite sleep position. As the Cleveland Clinic explains, sleeping on your back uses gravity to keep your body in even alignment over your spine, which can help reduce any unnecessary pressure on your back or joints.

To sleep on your stomach, you need to sleep with your head to one side, invariably turning your neck and head out of alignment with the rest of the spine. Therefore, at the end of the day, the best sleeping position may simply be the one that makes you feel better the next day. Like everyone who sleeps on their backs, people who sleep in a starfish position may be prone to snoring and have trouble sleeping. More than half of people have position-dependent sleep apnea, which means that the severity of their symptoms increases when they lie on their backs.

Sleeping on your side can also contribute to facial wrinkles, as the face is pressed against the pillow, stretching and compressing the skin. It is also common for people to wake up with new aches and pains in the morning, sometimes due to sleep position.

Lena Dubler
Lena Dubler

Amateur analyst. Typical travel geek. Proud social media expert. Hipster-friendly travel buff. Avid coffee evangelist.

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