How does sleep reduce stress?

Sleep is a powerful stress reducer. Following a regular SLEEP routine calms and restores the body, improves concentration, regulates mood and sharpens judgment and decision-making.

How does sleep reduce stress?

Sleep is a powerful stress reducer. Following a regular SLEEP routine calms and restores the body, improves concentration, regulates mood and sharpens judgment and decision-making. You solve problems better and are better able to cope with stress when you are well rested. While Gen X members report fewer hours of sleep, Millennials report poorer sleep habits than other adults.

And for teens who sleep less than eight hours a school night, many say their stress level has increased over the past year (42 percent), compared to 23 percent of teens who sleep at least eight hours a school night. In addition, 18 percent of teens say that when they don't get enough sleep, they are more stressed and 36 percent of teens report feeling tired due to stress in the past month. Adults with higher stress levels (eight, nine, or 10 on a 10-point scale) fare even worse. Forty-five percent feel even more stressed if they don't get enough sleep.

More than a third of millennials say they don't sleep at least eight hours a night because they have too many things to do and don't have enough time (35 percent compared to 19 percent of generation X, 13 percent of boomers, and 6 percent of mature ones). So if someone asks you “does more sleep reduce stress?” , you can say “YES” but let them know so they don't sleep too much. A study by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) found that sleep loss leads to increased cortisol the next night. During sleep, the brain also consolidates memory so you can remember it correctly when you wake up.

This can become part of your everyday reality as soon as you take enough time to get a good night's sleep and reduce stress. If you have difficulty sleeping during stressful times or still feel tired after a full night's sleep, know that you are not alone. Teens with lower levels of stress reported during the last school year are also more likely than highly stressed adolescents to say they have excellent or very good quality sleep (59% vs. When they don't get enough sleep, more than half of teens (53 percent) report feeling slow or lazy and 42 percent say they feel irritable.

Not only does sleep affect what elevated cortisol affects; if it remains high, it can lead to headaches, high blood pressure, and even sleep problems, exacerbating the problem. While sleep can be difficult during difficult periods, it's also important not to let it get in the way, says Dr. Mental health professionals, including psychologists, clinically licensed social workers, and chaplains, can also help address underlying anxiety or mood disorders that may be affecting sleep.

Lena Dubler
Lena Dubler

Amateur analyst. Typical travel geek. Proud social media expert. Hipster-friendly travel buff. Avid coffee evangelist.

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